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NASA Image Of The Day

The NACA Spirit Captured, 1945
NASA Image Of The Day
In this 1945 photo, test pilots (from left) Mel Gough, Herb Hoover, Jack Reeder, Steve Cavallo and Bill Gray stand in front of a P-47 Thunderbolt. The photo was taken at the then-named Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, which was a research facility for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, or the NACA. The NACA was the main institutional basis for creating NASA in 1958. On March 3, 1915 ? one hundred years ago -- the U.S. Congress established the NACA in order "to supervise and direct the scientific study of the problems of flight with a view to their practical solution."  From humble beginnings with a $5000 budget, no paid staff and no facilities, the NACA won the Collier trophy five times. Its researchers made critical contributions to victory in World War II, spawned a world-leading civil aviation manufacturing industry, propelled supersonic flight, supported national security during the Cold War, and laid the foundation for modern air travel and the space age. Learn more about the 100th anniversary of the founding of the NACA at www.nasa.gov/naca100. Image Credit: NASA...
03 Mar 2015
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Space Station Live Stream Print
Written by Administrator   
Saturday, 01 October 2011 00:00

 

Full screen mode - Click the button on the right side of the embedded player

 

 

Live Space Station Views
 
Live Space Station Video includes internal views from cameras in the International Space Station's Destiny Laboratory and Harmony module when the resident astronauts are on duty. Earth views from external cameras on the station’s structure will be available during crew off-duty periods.

The video will be accompanied by live audio of conversations between the crew and the Mission Control network.

Television from the station is available only when the complex is in contact with the ground through its high-speed communications antenna and NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. During "loss of signal" periods, Internet viewers may see a test pattern or a graphical world map that depicts the station’s location in orbit above the Earth using real-time telemetry sent to Mission Control from the station.

Since the station orbits the Earth once every 90 minutes, it sees a sunrise or a sunset every 45 minutes. When the station is in darkness, external camera video may appear black, but also may provide spectacular views of city lights below.

Last Updated on Friday, 17 February 2012 15:44
 
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