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NASA Image Of The Day

Sunrise From the International Space Station
NASA Image Of The Day
NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman posted this image of a sunrise, captured from the International Space Station, to social media on Oct. 29, 2014. Wiseman wrote, "Not every day is easy. Yesterday was a tough one. #sunrise" Wiseman was referring to the loss on Oct. 28 of the Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket and Cygnus spacecraft, moments after launch at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The Cygnus spacecraft was filled with about 5,000 pounds of supplies slated for the International Space Station, including science experiments, experiment hardware, spare parts, and crew provisions. The station crew is in no danger of running out of food or other critical supplies. Image Credit: NASA/Reid Wiseman...
29 Oct 2014
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ESA Navigation
ESA Navigation

  • Galileo duo handed over in excellent shape

    A pair of fully functioning Galileo navigation satellites was recently delivered to its operators, as preparations get underway for the next round of launches.



  • China to join effort developing post-2020 aircraft satnav standards

    Aircraft employ satellite navigation too: Europe’s EGNOS augmentation system sharpens the accuracy and reliability of GPS signals so they can safely be used for landing approaches across a growing number of European airports. But aviation is a global enterprise – so the aim is to develop a seamless network of augmentation systems in future.



  • Galileo satellites – status update

    The fifth and sixth Galileo satellites have been in a safe state since 28 August, fully under control from ESA’s centre in Darmstadt, Germany, despite having been released on 22 August into lower and elliptical orbits instead of the expected circular orbits.



  • Team of teams

    Human spaceflight & operations image of the week: The experts who brought the Galileo satellites under control

  • Update on Galileo launch injection anomaly

    Operations continue smoothly for Galileo Sat 5-6. Both satellites now have both sets of their solar arrays fully deployed and generating power.



  • Galileo status

    Updates on the Galileo Soyuz launch injection anomaly

  • Update on Galileo launch injection anomaly

    Work at ESA’s ESOC control centre continues relentlessly on the two Galileo satellites.



  • Soyuz Galileo launch: injection anomaly

    Following the announcement made by Arianespace on the anomalies of the orbit injection of the Galileo satellites, the teams of industries and agencies involved in the early operations of the satellites are investigating the potential implications on the mission.



  • New launch date for Galileo

    Arianespace has announced the next launch attempt for Soyuz VS09 with Europe's fifth and sixth Galileo satellites is 22 August at 12:27 GMT, 14:27 CEST.



  • ESA and CNES experts ready for Galileo’s first orbits

    Lift-off for Galileo satellites 5 and 6 is set for Thursday, 21 August, at 12:31 GMT (14:31 CEST) on a Soyuz rocket from the Guiana Space Centre, French Guiana.

    Just 9 minutes and 23 seconds later, the Fregat upper stage carrying the payload will separate from the Soyuz third stage, and conduct a pair of engine burns separated by an approximately three-hour ballistic coast phase.

    Three hours and 47 minutes after launch, the Galileo satellites will separate into free-flight orbit, 23 522 km above Earth. On board each satellite, an automatic sequence will be triggered, switching the spacecraft on, booting up the onboard software, deploying a pair of solar arrays and orienting the spacecraft toward the Sun.



  • Galileo satellites seated atop Soyuz launcher

    Europe’s latest two Galileo satellites have been placed on top of their Soyuz launcher, ready for their ride to orbit tomorrow.



  • Galileo fixes worldwide

    ESA's offer to issue certificates for the very first 50 Galileo fixes provoked responses from across the whole world

  • Sea trial

    Results are being processed from a long-range Galileo maritime trial spanning the North Sea

  • First airborne fix

    For the first time, Europe has been able to determine an aircraft's position using only Galileo

  • Navipedia

    Visit Navipedia, the web’s leading resource on satellite navigation: http://www.navipedia.net

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