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NASA Image Of The Day

The Odd Trio
NASA Image Of The Day
The Cassini spacecraft captures a rare family photo of three of Saturn's moons that couldn't be more different from each other! As the largest of the three, Tethys (image center) is round and has a variety of terrains across its surface. Meanwhile, Hyperion (to the upper-left of Tethys) is the "wild one" with a chaotic spin and Prometheus (lower-left) is a tiny moon that busies itself sculpting the F ring. To learn more about the surface of Tethys (660 miles, or 1,062 kilometers across), see PIA17164. More on the chaotic spin of Hyperion (168 miles, or 270 kilometers across) can be found at PIA07683. And discover more about the role of Prometheus (53 miles, or 86 kilometers across) in shaping the F ring in PIA12786. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 1 degree above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 14, 2014. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.2 million miles (1.9 million kilometers) from Tethys and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 22 degrees. Image scale is 7 miles (11 kilometers) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute...
22 Sep 2014
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ESA Observing the Earth
ESA Observing the Earth

  • Helsinki

    Earth observation image of the week: the jagged Baltic coastline near Finland’s capital, also featured on the Earth from Space video programme

  • ESA trains tomorrow’s Earth observation scientists

    World-renowned remote sensing experts gathered in Valencia, Spain, last week to train the next generation of Earth observation scientists in the exploitation of satellite data for land applications.



  • My Planet from Space

    Discover the beauty and fragility of our planet in a special exhibition at the Palazzo delle Esposizioni in Rome, Italy on 30 September – 2 November

  • Paving the way for carbon mission

    Scientists met in California this summer to test new methods for measuring greenhouse gases. This joint effort helps to show how ESA’s CarbonSat candidate satellite mission could identify sources of carbon dioxide and methane and how they disperse in the atmosphere.



  • Bringing Earth observation to the everyday user

    Using satellites for improving the exploitation of water resources is just one of the innovative ideas developed over the week-long 'camp' dedicated to creating mobile apps drawing on Earth observation data. 



  • Bardarbunga belches

    Satellites are showing clouds of sulphur dioxide from Iceland’s restive Bardarbunga volcano.



  • Radar vision maps Napa Valley earthquake

    Sentinel-1A has added yet another string to its bow. Radar images from this fledgling satellite have been used to map the rupture caused by the biggest earthquake that has shaken northern California in 25 years.



  • A wing for Sentinel-2A

    Imaging Earth’s land with unprecedented speed and resolution has come another step closer as the next Sentinel satellite has been given its solar wing and started a strenuous six-month test campaign to make sure that it is fit for launch next April.



  • Monitoring volcanoes

    Radar satellites, like Sentinel-1A, can detect ground movements down to the millimetre, helping us to understand the processes happening below Earth’s surface

  • Magnetic field update

    The Swarm satellites have mapped changes in Earth’s magnetic field over the last six months. Discover more about our planet’s ever-changing protective shield

  • Where is it?

    Some of the most familiar places can be difficult to recognise from a satellite’s point of view – can you place these images on a map?

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